Atlantic Salmon

Atlantic Salmon By: Deborah Reid Salmo salar Bay salmon, Black salmon, Caplin-Scull salmon, Sebago salmon, Silver salmon, Fiddler, Outside salmon In the fall, when Pacific salmon is no longer available, it’s replaced through to spring by organic Cape d’Or Atlantic salmon. Whole on our counter they have a silver-blue sheen with black spots on the upper body, and average 60 to 76 cm (24 to 30 in.) in length and weigh 3.5 to 5.5 kg (8 to 12 lbs.). The thick, pinkish-orange fillets have a natural fatty sheen and a buttery finish when cooked. We love the sweet flavour and succulent large medium-firm flakes. Fill the belly with bread or grain-based stuffing and roast whole for special occasion dinners. Cure a fillet for gravlax, or hot smoke it on a barbecue for the holidays. Poach it in aromatic court bouillon and serve with rich lemony hollandaise or basil mayonnaise. Pan-fry it until golden, basting it with butter and fresh thyme or rosemary. It’s just as delicious eaten raw as tartare...

ROCKFISH

ROCKFISH Salish Sea & Haida Gwaii, B.C. Canada B.C. Rockfish is the closest thing to snapper in flavour and texture that is fished responsibly in Canada. Cooking Methods: Grilling, roasting, pan roasting, marinated kebabs, in soups. Information: Our B.C. rockfish is a fairly new addition to the offerings at Hooked. Previously considered a by-catch species, rockfish is now a staple at the shop due to its abundance in the waters off the B.C. coast, as well as the great fishing methods employed to harvest it. We work with a small group of fishers in the Salish Sea who fish rockfish using traps. This ensures very limited to no bycatch and zero habitat damage. Rockfish from our Haida Gwaii fishers is bottom longline caught and is part of the same fishery as our halibut, ling cod and...

Nova Scotia Lobster

NOVA SCOTIA LOBSTER Nova Scotia, Canada East Coast Canadian Lobster is a world treasure. Sweet, salty, meaty and fun to eat. Cooking Methods: Steeping, poaching, grilling whole Information: The Nova Scotia lobster fishery operates year round, moving to different fishing zones every 6 weeks to 3 months. The lobster stocks are abundant, mainly due to the poor state of the cod fishery in Atlantic Canada. Lobster are trap caught: fishers go out in the wee hours, bait their traps and drop them. Later that same day, the traps get hauled into the boat, lobsters get sized and are then banded (elastics applied to the claws) or thrown back if over or under sized. There is little to no bycatch in the lobster fishery. Most lobster is sold through one big processor and then held in tanks for months until sold. We at Hooked prefer to buy directly from a lobster fisherman. Our lobster arrives fresh and live Fridays, having only been held a day or two in tank. It’s worth it: the fisher gets...

Selva Shrimp

SELVA TIGER SHRIMP Mekong Delta, Vietnam Firm, sweet and clean are the defining characteristics of this shrimp success story. Cooking Methods: Pan frying, poaching, grilling, brining, Information: Tiger shrimp at Hooked? You bet. This is one of the greatest success stories in modern aquaculture. These shrimp live and grow naturally in the mangroves of southern Vietnam. Mangroves are a natural nursery and breeding grounds for many species. While the destruction of the vital mangroves has been rampant, the Selva company has a reforestation plan in place. The shrimp are not fed at all, and so are free of anything not naturally occurring in the ocean. Once the shrimp have reached a mature size, they naturally head out to sea. At this point, the ‘farmers’ harvest the shrimp using hand nets between the mangroves and the open ocean. The shrimp are iced, cleaned and frozen within 24 hours of harvest. Both farmers and processing plant workers are paid a fair wage for their...

Cape D’Or Atlantic Salmon

Cape D'Or Atlantic Salmon Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada We have waited over a decade to be able to eat healthy Atlantic salmon and are thrilled that it is finally here! Mild and rich with a high fat content, suitable to most cooking methods and available through the winter and spring, when our wild Pacific salmon is not in season. Cooking Methods: Pan frying, slow baking, poaching, grilling, en papillotte, pan roasting, high heat roasting, brining, hot and cold smoking Information: Atlantic farmed salmon has been a dirty word since we opened Hooked. So much of it is being farmed terribly to the harm of our wild waters and to those who eat it. We finally have a great source for this much desired large fish: mainland Nova Scotia. The salmon are farmed on land, beside the ocean, in tanks that are filled with water piped directly from the depths of the ocean. The fish are raised in low population densities, eliminating the need for antibiotics or growth hormones. They are fed an organic...

Fish Cooking Tips

Fish Cooking Tips Tips for great fish: Temperature Fish must be pulled from the fridge a minimum of 20 minutes prior to cooking to allow it to come to room temperature. Cooking fish directly from the cold will result in a dry outer flake, as cooking time will be prolonged in order to get the cold middle cooked. Vessels: Pan Frying & pan roasting A heavy pan is critical to stove top cooking. Stainless, cast iron or enameled cast iron are all great options. Heavier pans have fewer hot spots, maintain an even heat, and hold their heat longer. Steaming We prefer to steam our fish in bamboo steamer baskets. Bamboo tends to naturally be non stick, imparts a nice flavour and smell to your fish. Bamboo baskets are inexpensive and can be found at any Asian grocer or kitchen supply shop. Parchment paper, not aluminium foil We love parchment paper. We cook en papillote with parchment, line baking sheets with parchment and even use it in place of a lid at times! It is naturally non-stick,...

En Papillotte

En Papillotte We use this cooking method all of the time: no fuss, no muss. It’s a gentle cooking method that is similar to steaming. We like to shave seasonal vegetables thinly (carrot, beet, leek, fennel, asparagus etc…) and create a base for the fish. A little butter, white wine and herbs and you have a meal. preheat oven to 450º take a square of parchment paper large enough to fold in half over the individual fish and vegetable portion, or a parchment bag, and lay the vegetables in a little stack. The more colourful the better. Lay the fish on top. Spoon or drizzle a little liquid (wine, lemon juice, stock, coconut milk), top with a little butter and season well with salt. fold the paper over the fish and roll up the edges to seal and create a little package. place onto a baking sheet and into the oven. A thin filet will be done in 6 minutes, thicker filets will take 8 to 10 minutes. check for doneness, place each parcel on a plate and serve immediately. Just warn your guests...

Pan Frying

Pan Frying start fish from room temperature cut fish into individual portions for easy manipulation season with sea salt on both sides of the filet preheat a heavy pan over medium heat until HOT, about 3-5 minutes add a few teaspoons of fat to the pan: non GMO vegetable oils such as grapeseed, canola, sunflower coconut oil, a mix of butter and one of the above, as butter will burn on its own place the fish SKIN SIDE DOWN. If fish curls up, press down with spatula for a minute. let the fish cook, skin side down, without touching for 3 to 4 minutes. Once the skin side is brown and crisp (check after 4 minutes), and the flesh side is mostly opaque, gently turn fish over. Turn the pan off, and let finish cooking 1 to 2 minutes. Test for doneness (see...

Steaming

Steaming We rarely steamed fish until we opened the shop. Who knew?! (besides most of coastal and lakeside Asia;) It is now one of our favourite ways to cook whole bream, branzino, perch and trout. Thick filets of lingcod, pacific cod and halibut work well too. start fish from room temperature place a bamboo steamer basket snugly into a shallow pan or pot. Fill with water (or stock) to just below the base of the basket. Cover with a lid and bring to a boil. line the basket with green onions, ginger, galangal, cilantrof or whatever flavours you feel will pair well with your meal. place the fish into the basket, being careful to not over crowd. cover with the lid. This method is HOT, so typically a thick piece of fish will take no longer than 6 to 8 minutes. Set a timer a little earlier and check for doneness to assess cooking...

Poaching

Poaching We like to poach our fish in a flavourful liquid such as a coconut curry, tandoori curry or fennel and tomato broth. Gone are the days of poaching whole fish in court bouillon. We find it is best to make a flavourful base, bring to a gentle simmer, and submerge fileted pieces of fish. A thinner filet (trout, pickerel) will take 4-6 minutes to cook through, whereas a thicker filet will take closer to ten minutes. once liquid is at a steady simmer, and flavour is where you want it to be, submerge room-temperature filets into the liquid. This is a gentle cooking method, so the most action you should see in your pan is the occasional bubble. while the fish is cooking, warm shallow bowls, finish any starch or vegetable accompanying the dish. Check for doneness, remembering that the fish will continue to cook in the hot broth in the bowl. Best to go a tiny bit under, rather than...