Fish Cooking Tips

Tips for great fish:

Temperature
Fish must be pulled from the fridge a minimum of 20 minutes prior to cooking to allow it to come to room temperature. Cooking fish directly from the cold will result in a dry outer flake, as cooking time will be prolonged in order to get the cold middle cooked.

Vessels:
Pan Frying & pan roasting
A heavy pan is critical to stove top cooking. Stainless, cast iron or enameled cast iron are all great options. Heavier pans have fewer hot spots, maintain an even heat, and hold their heat longer.
Steaming
We prefer to steam our fish in bamboo steamer baskets. Bamboo tends to naturally be non stick, imparts a nice flavour and smell to your fish. Bamboo baskets are inexpensive and can be found at any Asian grocer or kitchen supply shop.
Parchment paper, not aluminium foil
We love parchment paper. We cook en papillote with parchment, line baking sheets with parchment and even use it in place of a lid at times! It is naturally non-stick, does not transfer any flavours or compounds and is biodegradable. Aluminium foil has its uses, but not for fish cooking. Foil will stick. Aluminium transfers compounds to us that are known to be harmful. It is not biodegradable.

Grill Care
We like to take a few steps to ensure perfectly grilled fish on the outdoor BBQ:
1. preheat the grill on high with the lid closed for 5 to minutes. This will burn off any residue from your last grill session.
2. use a wire brush to remove residue and clean your grill
3. turn the heat down to medium once your grill is clean and preheated
4. take half an onion, drizzle with oil and rub vigourously onto the grill. This will oil or ‘season’ your grill, while imparting good flavour.

Checking for Doneness
To check to see if your fish is cooked, insert a metal skewer or a small paring knife into the fattest section of the fish. Leave for 5 seconds. Remove and immediately touch the metal to your inner wrist or lower lip.
cool: fish is still very rare
warm: fish is medium rare
very warm: fish is medium
just hot: fish is cooked
very hot: fish is overcooked